Safety Tips to Avoid Electrocution Accidents

In small doses, electric shocks do not cause injury; curious minds might even find them intriguing. If a car door gives you a mild electrical shock when you go to close it, it does not hurt very much. Electricity is also the reason that the Van de Graaff generator is one of the most popular exhibits at any children’s science museum. In higher amounts, though, electric shocks can cause serious injury or even be fatal. When electrocution accidents are caused by dangerous conditions in workplaces and other public places, the property owner may be legally liable for causing the accident. In fact, many electrocution accidents can be avoided if workers and employers exercise proper caution and follow safety protocols.

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Electrical Hazards at Work

In the United States, about 4,000 people suffer injuries because of electrical hazards in the workplace each year. About 300 people per year die from electrocution accidents at work.

Electric shocks are not the only type of accident that can result from electrical hazards in the workplace. They can also cause fires and explosions.

Electrical Accidents are Preventable

Many electrical accidents can be prevented if employers make efforts to keep electrical equipment safe and high voltage areas isolated and if workers are careful with electricity. Here are some ways to avoid electrical accidents:

  • Workplaces should display signs warning workers and visitors of electrical hazards.
  • Hurrying is a major cause of workplace electrocution accidents. Workers should not rush to finish their work quickly when working with electricity. Likewise, employers should not put time pressure on workers when they are working in the presence of electrical hazards.
  • Proper safety training is key when there are electrical hazards in the workplace. In some occupations that require working with dangerous levels of electricity, knowledge of electricity safety protocols is part of the requirements for certification. Even for workers who are knowledgeable about electrical hazard safety, and especially for those who have not gone through a certification process that requires safety standards but who may be working in hazardous areas, ongoing training about electrical hazards and proper safety measures is key.
  • Anyone who might be exposed to high levels of electricity, whether a worker or a visitor, should wear proper protective gear.
  • Turn off all electrical equipment before a person touches it, for example, to clean it. If possible, you should wait a few minutes after turning it off and before touching it.
  • Because aluminum is a conductor or electricity, you should not use aluminum ladders near electrical wires or electrical equipment. Instead, use a fiberglass ladder, since fiberglass is an insulator.
  • If you will be using electrical equipment, make sure that the area is dry. Do not use electrical equipment near water, since water can conduct electricity.

Contact Case Barnett About Electrocution Accidents

If you have been injured in an accident involving electrical hazards, you may have grounds for a personal injury lawsuit. Contact Case Barnett in Costa Mesa, California for a consultation about your case.

Preventing Accidental Overdoses of Acetaminophen: Is Legal Action Required?

Screen Shot 2017-12-15 at 3.14.11 PM.pngAcetaminophen, which goes by the brand name Tylenol in the United States and the names paracetamol and Panadol in other countries, is one of the most widely consumed over-the-counter drugs. It is the only widely available over-the-counter painkiller that does not belong to the category of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Popular over-the-counter NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), and naproxen sodium (Aleve). While millions of people routinely take acetaminophen to relieve minor pain and do not suffer any adverse effects, taking an overdose of acetaminophen can cause acute liver failure and has even led to several deaths; thus, it has been at the center of several product liability lawsuits.  What is most alarming in these cases is that, sometimes, the doses at which the patients suffered adverse consequences were not very much higher than the recommended therapeutic doses. So far, there is no agreement on the best way to prevent accidental overdoses of acetaminophen.

How do Acetaminophen Overdoses Happen?

Acetaminophen is metabolized in the liver. The current recommended dose is not to exceed four grams of acetaminophen per day. That is equivalent to eight tablets of Extra Strength Tylenol in a 24-hour period (usually two pills every six hours). Some acetaminophen-containing OTC drugs, such as Excedrin Migraine, contain almost that much acetaminophen in a single dose, and thus, they are intended to be taken only once per day. At higher doses than that, liver damage can occur. Symptoms of overdose include nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain; in many cases, the patient does not seek treatment until the liver damage is advanced, mistaking these symptoms as simply part of his or her illness. One of the reasons that acetaminophen overdoses are as frequent as they are (about 150 cases per year in the United States) is that acetaminophen is an ingredient in many common OTC medicines, including Nyquil and Theraflu. If you take the recommended dose of several of these medicines, you may be taking more acetaminophen than you realize.

For example, Marcus Trunk suffered a wrist injury at his construction job in 1995, and he took Extra Strength Tylenol every day to relieve the pain from his injury while recovering. Shortly thereafter, he developed flu-like symptoms and began taking Theraflu, while continuing his regimen of Extra Strength Tylenol for his injury. Within a few weeks, he had died from liver failure at the age of 23.

How to Prevent Acetaminophen Overdoses

Manufacturers have begun to label acetaminophen-containing OTC medicines more clearly, so that patients do not unwittingly take higher doses than recommended. Consumers should also read the labels on OTC medicines carefully to be sure of how much of each active ingredient they are taking. Some countries have lowered the maximum recommended dose as a precaution.  Some even restrict the amount of acetaminophen one person can buy within a certain period of time, much the way the United States restricts the sale of certain cold and cough medicines with considerable potential for abuse.

Contact Case Barnett About Product Liability Cases

Have you suffered illness or injury because of a faulty or improperly labeled over-the-counter medicine? Contact Case Barnett in Costa Mesa, California for a consultation to see if you have grounds for a lawsuit.

Beware of Common Hazards at Sports Stadiums

Baseball season is in full “swing” (pun intended), and over the course of the next several months, hundreds of thousands of individuals in the California area will flock to one or more sports arenas to cheer on the home team (whether that would be the Athletics, the Padres, the Giants, the Dodgers, or the Angels). While a baseball game can be a great way to spend a weekend or weeknight, the venues in which these events are held are full of dangers and hazards that can cause you, your spouse, and/or your children significant harm.

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Top Five Common Dangers at Sporting Arenas

Tragedy can befall you and/or your family at the ballpark if those in charge of maintaining the park in a reasonably safe condition fail to perform their duties. Common hazards that lead to significant injuries include:

  •      Wet floors / dirty floors: Hot dogs, condiments, and/or water are just a few of the substances that can make walkways and restrooms at the ballpark slippery for pedestrians. Falls due to slippery floors can be especially dangerous for older ballpark patrons as their injuries may be more severe and/or require significantly more time from which to heal.
  •      Flying objects: Foul balls and splintered bats can strike fans who are not paying attention. The force with which these and other items from the playing field enter the stands and strike spectators is significant: as a result, deep internal injuries, concussions, and/or other catastrophic injuries are possible under these circumstances.
  •      Other fans and spectators: In the not-too-distant past (In 2011, to be precise), a Giants fan was severely beaten in the parking lot of Dodger Stadium after a matchup between the two teams. It was alleged that the owners of Dodger Stadium did not have enough security present to prevent or disrupt a fight.
  •      Elevators and escalators: Elevators and escalators are useful and helpful in moving large numbers of people up and down the many floors of a sports arena. However, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 30 individuals are killed and another 17,000 injured every year in elevator and escalator accidents. An elevator or escalator accident is more likely to occur if the device has not been serviced or maintained properly.
  •      Food poisoning: A 2009 ABC News report cited findings from ESPN that at 30 stadiums across the nation over half of food vendors were in violation of food safety standards. In California, the report showed that 16 percent of vendors were found to be in violation at Dodger Stadium, 13 percent of vendors were in violation at Angel Stadium, 10 percent of vendors were in violation at Petco Park, and 4 percent of vendors were in violation at AT&T Park.

When to Call Your Orange Count Personal Injury Law Firm

If you or a loved one are injured while at the ballpark this season, speak with your California personal injury attorneys at Case Barnett Law before agreeing to a settlement with the park owners. You may be waiving important legal rights by signing a settlement. We can quickly and thoroughly review your case and inform you of all your legal options so you can make the best decision for yourself and your family moving forward. Call Case Barnett Law at (949) 861-2990, or contact us online today.

Is Your Child at Risk of a Daycare Injury Accident?

 

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For many California parents, daycare is not a luxury – it is a necessity. When a parent lives away from friends and family members who are able to stay with the child with the parent is at work, a daycare facility is usually the parent’s last resort – somewhere where the child can be safe and supervised while the parent is away at work. When using a daycare facility, the parent may be lulled into a false sense of security: The regulations and laws with which a daycare facility in California must comply in order to continue operations can make a parent feel confident that their child will return to them from the daycare facility uninjured and in good health. This is not always the case, however.

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Common Daycare Injuries to Children

As much as parents may not wish to dwell on the thought, a daycare can be a dangerous place for a young child. Some children have been injured through deliberate acts inflicted upon them by daycare staff, but a child can suffer serious – even fatal – injuries simply because a daycare worker acted carelessly or had a momentary lapse of judgment. Just a few of the injuries that can befall a young child while at daycare include:

  •      Falls down steps or falls from heights which can lead to traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, or even death;
  •      Cuts and serious lacerations from sharp objects like scissors or knives that are left in areas accessible to children, or from sharp corners on tables and other furniture;
  •      Serious burns of various types. Chemical burns can result from being exposed to powerful cleaners and disinfectants (even the fumes can cause internal injuries). Electrical burns can come about if the child is permitted to play with an active electrical socket. Heat burns can occur when the child is permitted to touch a hot stove or radiator.
  •     Traumatic brain injuries, neck and back injuries, broken bones, and other injuries commonly associated with car accidents if the child is being transported in a daycare vehicle and the driver is involved in a crash.

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Parents of daycare-age children should carefully investigate a daycare facility before enrolling their children in the facility. Ensure that the facility is properly certified by the State of California. Tour the building and speak with the teachers, assistants, and staff. Does it appear that there are too many children and not enough adults? Are children supervised or do they appear to run wild? Are the facility, toys, and equipment in a good state of repair or are things falling apart? When it comes to your child’s safety, go with your gut – if you do not feel comfortable leaving your child at the facility for eight hours or more each day, it may be advisable to find another facility.

When to Call a Southern California Daycare Injury Attorney

If your child was injured while at a California daycare, you may be entitled to compensation for your expenses and losses. Contact Case Barnett Law Firm at (949) 861-2990 today, or contact us online to discuss your case.